6/20/18

Passion to Profession: L@5 6/8/18

Here are the show notes for the latest 
Instagram Live @ Five
Original Broadcast: June 8, 2018



"I want to paint full-time, how do I go about turning my art into a profession?" 

This great question, submitted by one of our viewers, formed the basis for the June 8th broadcast of 
Live @ Five.

Here is the show recap!

From Passion to Profession... 


The most important thing to do in order to turn your Passion into a Profession is to start thinking of your studio/creative endeavors as a business!
  • Develop a long-term plan for where you want your creative efforts to take you.
  • Continue generating your art/offering and commit yourself to creating a meaningful body of work.
  • As you're building up your portfolio you also need to set aside half of your time to growing and marketing your business (yes, I said 50% of your time).
  • Really take it seriously and think of your work as much as a business as it is a creative, artistic practice!

These are the 4 key elements I recommend you have in place if you wish to transform your creative endeavors from a pastime profession to a full-time profession:

1. Business License
  • Make sure your operation is up to any local or national legal standards.
  • I recommend using your proper name as your business name, for example "Jane Smith Art", "Jane Smith Studio", etc.
    • People need to be able to identify you as the business owner so that they can further connect with you.
    • Oftentimes creative and whimsical business names, while fun to create, obscure the person behind the business. 
    • By using your proper name in your business licensing your name can stay the same even if your business transforms.

2. Social Media
  • You should have one or more social media accounts
    • Set-up accounts on as many platforms as you like: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, Snapchat, etc. 
      • Don't overextend yourself.
      • In the beginning, narrow down to one or two platforms that you enjoy as a user and nurture those daily to build an engaged audience. 
      • (Oh, by the way... I'm in the process right now of creating an online course that will help you through this very process. In the course I'm sharing the methods I currently use to grow my own creative enterprise using social media.)
  • Remain professional and on brand when posting to your social media accounts.
    • Save the rants, vacation photos, and cat videos for private accounts only.
  • Be consistent across all your profiles so people know who you are no matter what platform they find you on.
    • Use your business name, based on your personal name, for all your accounts.
    • Use the same photo of you (recommend) or of your logo for all your accounts .
  • Post regularly to your profiles.
    • I recommend once daily for Instagram and 2-3 times a week for Facebook.

3. Website

  • It's a must that you have a website, it's your home base on the internet and should include, at minimum:
    • Portfolio 
      • People will contact you through your creative work so let that be the focal element.
      • If you have an extensive portfolio (more than 25 or so images) pare it down or organize into groups.
    • Contact information 
      • Make sure visitors to your website have a way to reach you. 
    • About page
      • Tell visitors about your creative enterprise; who you are, what you create, and why you do it.
      • Share what makes you unique and what makes your art special. 
  • When you first create your website here are some things to consider:
    • It does not have to be perfect, just get it up and live so people have a place to go to see your work and get to know you better.
    • Even just a contact page as a placeholder for a full website is enough until you get things going.
    • You can build out as you go and add more elements.
    • Don't get stuck in perpetual "Coming Soon"; remember your goal should be published not perfect, get something up and you can tweak it later.

4. Business Card
  • This may seem old school in today's digital world, but a business card will be one of the hardest working assets in your marketing toolkit.
  • What to include:
    • An image of your art, offering, or a design which conveys your unique style.
    • Your name.
    • Your discipline/offering.
    • Your preferred method of contact (if you only want to be contacted via email then just include your email address).
    • Your social media handles.

To catch the next Live @ Five tune in to my Instagram @AliciaTormey every Friday at 5pm PST. Thanks for watching, thanks for listening, and thanks for reading!

To learn more about Alicia's original art, hands-on workshops, and online courses, check out her website aliciatormey.com.

6/6/18

Live @ Five Show Notes 6/1/18

Here are the show notes for the latest 
Instagram Live @ Five
Original Broadcast date: June 1, 2018


Thank you so much for watching Live @ Five! If you missed the show, here are some of the topics and questions I went over during the broadcast along with some links and images to go along with the information.


  • Where do I sign my artwork, how do I sign, and what is the best way to sign an encaustic painting?
    • Multiple options; on the back, on the side, or on the front by scarring and filling with oil or with carbon transfer paper or with some type of stamp.
    • Signature doesn’t have to be visible.
    • When you find a way that works best for you then stick with it and be consistent; sign all your work the same way (with a few exceptions).
    • I don’t like to sign the front because my signature is big, loopy, and graphic, so I usually sign it on the back with a sharpie, but not until I feel like the piece is ready to go out of the studio.
    • I add the year it was made and occasionally also the title of the piece.
    • Sometimes I will sign the side if the piece if it is going to be on display in a public space like a hotel lobby.


  • Do I use a stylus to create my controlled drips (aka “pearl drops”)?
    • Check out my Instagram highlights for a speed tutorial on this and for a full tutorial check out the Learn to Burn e-course.

  • Why do I use a torch and not a heat gun?
    • I get more versatility out of a torch because you can control the intensity of the flame.
  • Where do you get your color inspiration?
    • Nobody does color or color combinations better than Mother Nature. (flowers and fruit are great color sources)
  • Suggestions for attracting the right audience
    • Know who your audience is before worrying about how or where to reach them.
    • Homework: sit down and imagine in a very clear way who is going to be drawn to your artwork; what do they do, where do they live, etc.
    • Once you know who your audience is it is much easier to find them!
  • When is the podcast going to be released?


    • Creative Crush is in the works and will be released soon! (Early Summer 2018)
    • You can get a sneak peek over at CreativeCrushPodcast.com 
    • I created a hotline just for you! Now you can call me directly with your burning questions, comments, or requests. 
    • Creative Crush Hotline is open: 206-880-0533
  • Many artists see my work and mistake it for an acrylic pour. Each week I field questions related to the acrylic pour process because it so closely resembles some of my techniques. I only work with encaustic so I am no authority when it comes to acrylic pours... but here are links to a few folks and their websites, Youtube channels, and Facebook groups (kindly provided by Live @ Five viewers) who can help you out.
  • Is there a specific type of clay you recommend that will work as a sculpture substrate?

    • Most of my sculptures are just wax without any substrate and this is what makes them super delicate.
    • If you are going to use clay, then make sure not to glaze it, glazed ceramic is sealed and your wax will just sit on top and not adhere to the substrate.
    • Whatever substrate you use, make sure it is rigid and absorbent.
  • Are collectors ever reticent about buying encaustic art
    • Yes, they are!
    • People hear the word “wax” when it comes to encaustic, and despite loving the painting, they are worried about it melting or being too fragile.
    • Your job as an encaustic artist is to educate collectors about the durability of your art.
    • Encaustic is really no more fragile or susceptible to damage than any other type of fine art.
    • Remember, encaustic is not just beeswax, it also has damar resinwhich elevates the overall melting temperature and makes the wax much more durable.

    • A good rule of thumb: Don’t leave an encaustic piece anywhere you wouldn’t leave a small child.
  • I want to spend a lot of time painting like you, what is the secret to making a living from art?
    • Tune in to the next Live @ Five as we dive into this topic!

Have more burning questions? Leave them in the comments below or send me an email. Thanks for reaching out, it’s always nice to hear from you!

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Live @ Five Show Notes 5/25/18

Here are the show notes for the latest 
Instagram Live @ Five
Original Broadcast date: May 25, 2018


Thank you so much for watching Live @ Five! If you missed the show, here are some of the topics covered along with some links and images.


Shellac
For more extensive info on shellac and the shellac burn technique, check out the Learn to Burn e-course!
  • Outside of the U.S.
    • Can be found in pharmacies in Mexico and called goma laca
    • Exactly the same in Canada, with the addition of French on the label
  • Amber VS clear
    • Clear shellac is just filtered amber
    • Sometimes referred to as 'orange' or 'brown' instead of amber or 'blonde' instead of clear
    • The clear starts milky but dries clear
    • Can make white shellac mixing titanium white and clear shellac
    • 90% of the time I use amber shellac either mixed with colored pigment or just on its own
  • Spray shellac
    • I never use spray shellac
      • Only comes in clear
      • Contains a chemical propellant that I don't want to mix into my paints
      • Comes out in a thin spray which will not give a good burn

Preparing and Finishing 
  • Painting the edges
    • The brand of paint does not matter
    • Any interior satin enamel paint will work 
    • I use the same dark espresso brown on all my pieces for consistency
  • Storage and display
    • Be mindful of extremes in temperature and extreme changes in temperature
    • Due to the addition of the damar resin, encaustic has a much higher melting point than plain beeswax
    • Direct exposure to strong sunlight can soften or cloud encaustic
    • Cold can cause the painting to crack
    • Don't store or display encaustic artwork where you wouldn't leave a small child
  • The shelf life of a piece
    • Encaustic as a medium does not deteriorate after repeated heating and cooling
    • Can return to and reactive a painting at any time, even years down the line
    • Encaustic hardens and cures after about 18 months and it is fine to go out into the world during this time
    • If you want to go in and add new paint over old, cured paint you might detect a difference in malleability so make sure to reactivate the wax with an even exposure to heat

Keeping Focus and Self-assurance 
  • Hone It & Own It!
    • Focus on the long haul; how do you imagine yourself and your art in 1, 5, 10 years from now
    • Know your 'why?' Why are you doing what you do?
    • Stop comparing yourself to others in a defeatist manner, don't think of how much better others are but think about how you can better yourself 
    • Practice, educate yourself, and invest your time
    • The artist's journey never ends

Just to let you know, this is an Amazon influencers page from which the studio will sometimes receive a small commission. That being said, these are all items I personally use in my studio and highly recommend to other encaustic artists like yourself! 


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5/22/18

Show Notes

Here are the show notes from the

Instagram Live @ Five 

Original Broadcast Date: May 18, 2018
Additional links and resources to the topics covered on the most recent LIVE show are listed here.


Topic: 

Art Collectors  
Where to find collectors...
Check out this documentary on some unlikely art collectors. Remember...everyone you know is a potential art collector.




















Topic: 
Opportunities For Submitting Your Artwork

Here's a resource for finding Calls for Art submissions:
Build up your show resume by participating in exhibitions.
LINK: https://www.callforentry.org
CaFÉ










Topic: 
Shellac - What kind of shellac do you use? 
This is the product I use...
and this is available in the hardware store.

Amber & Clear shellac. I mostly stick to using the AMBER option for the best results.


Shellac has an expiration date!

Shellac has a shelf life of 3 years in an unopened can.

A shelf life of 8 months once you open the can.

A studio life of 5 to 7 days after poured out into a container and repeatedly exposed to air. 


Here’s how to determine the year your shellac was manufactured:  




Each can of shellac has a Lot# printed on the lid. (See photo above) Generally the Lot# will start with the letter “S” followed by a series of numbers like the one pictured above. The first number to appear indicates the year your shellac was produced. The lot number in the photo sample shows that this was made in 2016. A number 7 would mean 2017 and a number 8 would indicate 2018. The year indicated will be within a recent 3 year span so we know by this sample that the lot number shown in the photo is indicating 2016 and not 2006

You’ll know it’s time to replace your shellac when it is not drying or burning properly and may have a strange odor. 


For in-depth instruction on how I use shellac in my own process check the 

Learn To Burn online course. learn.aliciatormey.com



Topic: 
Pigments - 
What kind and where to purchase?  
I use dry pigments to make colored shellac paint.
Heres a link: where to purchase pigments and 
( this is a curated affiliate page on Amazon to the products I use )


Topic: 
Encaustic Process - Where can I learn more?

Thank you for your interest in my process. If you want to learn exactly how I crate my artwork I created an online course that teaches you all of my encaustic painting techniques. Check out the Learn To Burn course here:




Thanks for tuning into Live @ Five
Email your burning questions to:
art (at) aliciatormey.com 
for a chance to be featured on an upcoming episode.
Be sure to put Live @ Five in your subject line. 
I'll try to help you sort out your questions about 
Art Process / Art Business / Art Life-ness

Check out more over on Instagram:
@aliciatormey

Cheers! Alicia

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5/19/18

Live @ Five Show Notes

Thank you for tuning in to this week's broadcast of LIVE @ FIVE over on Instagram!

(We are working on the show notes now and will make them available to you here on the blog very soon.)



If you missed the recent episode you can catch me next week... and every Friday at 5pm PST for a Live feed broadcast over on my Instagram profile, @aliciatormey


During the weekly broadcast you'll find: 

  • LIVE Demos of Encaustic Painting 
  • Hot Tips on running an art-based business
  • Answers to your burning questions with LIVE Q & A sessions
All available exclusively Fridays at 5pm on my Instagram LIVE broadcast.


Remember...

...the show is gone after 24hrs so catch it while it's hot. 


Join me LIVE at 5pm Pacific Standard Time

LIVE @ FIVE drops "OFF THE AIR" after 5pm Saturday.

 Thanks for joining me and I'll see you over on the 'gram! 

@aliciatormey